Dyno ball

Wow.. Just got my bike back from Docs Performance Tuning and this thing is a beast compared to what she was. Here's the details:
Have a 2013 FLTRX, already had Rinehart 's on. Everything else was stock.
I dropped her off with Doc and after talking with him, ended up going with a ness big sucker , rush true duals, TTS /dyno and Andrews 48h cams.
Went to pick her up and Doc said to take her for a ride. I did and man she was loud and mean. Great power and much better throttle response. Only thing I didn't care for was the sound of the Rineharts now. Talked it over with Doc and based on his recommendation I bought the Freedom Performance slash cut classic slip ons. Man, what a great improvement! She sounds so much better now!
Dyno numbers: 90hp and 110 ft lbs torque!
Doc is the man! Could talk with him for hours and just soak up his knowledge. You want your bike to run like it should, talk to Doc. He's the guy the dyno techs go to to learn from. He's honest and straight up and has his opinions on certain brands and he'll tell you why. Very informative guy.
Just wanted to share a great experience with you all. Google Docs Performance Tuning and give him a call if you are in, or going to be, in the central Florida area.

a. Initial cost. Generally grinding media that exhibit the best wear properties are more expensive than other options. Also the smaller the grinding media the more expensive it can become.
b. Grinding bead life. As grinding beads wear they need to be replaced. The longer a grinding bead lasts the cheaper it may be in the long run because of the costs associated with downtime, new beads, disposal and labor.
c. Mill wear. Low cost, hard grinding beads may lead to expensive equipment repairs.
d. Quality of product. Grinding media with less debris (under-sized or misshapen pieces) will tend to have a longer service life than cheaper material that might contain these artifacts.

SPECIAL NOTE. - GH6 hubs prior to 1952 had the adjusting cone on the dynamo side. This cone is extended to pass through the armature body and is flatted at the outer end to take (K428) notched adjuster washer, by means of which the cone may be turned. Dismantling instructions from 1 to 5 remain exactly the same as for the current model. For paragraph 6 read 'Unscrew the dynamo-side cone and lift the ball cage out of the hub shell. The spindle may now be pulled out from the other side, together with the fixed cone.' All further comments apply equally to all GH6 hubs.

There is a solution. For years the drag racing guys who run roller cams have been using bronze distributor gears. The bronze material is designed to be sacrificial, as the filings that are ground off are less harmful to the engine than steel filings. Also, race car engine oil is frequently changed, and the gears are also changed when worn. Our engine is destined for a street cruiser that may rack up a thousand miles a year. The owner would not find changing distributor gears entertaining. The solution is MSD’s new melonite-coated gear. We put this gear on the distributor and ran it for 20 minutes with no appreciable wear.

Dyno ball

dyno ball

There is a solution. For years the drag racing guys who run roller cams have been using bronze distributor gears. The bronze material is designed to be sacrificial, as the filings that are ground off are less harmful to the engine than steel filings. Also, race car engine oil is frequently changed, and the gears are also changed when worn. Our engine is destined for a street cruiser that may rack up a thousand miles a year. The owner would not find changing distributor gears entertaining. The solution is MSD’s new melonite-coated gear. We put this gear on the distributor and ran it for 20 minutes with no appreciable wear.

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